Friday, December 07, 2012

Obama and Native America.........

The mainstream Native American media can't get enough of the Chief Teleprompter.

The other day when Obama made his annual appeal to the Native American crowd he was in full campaign mode.

He spoke once again on the "fair shot" doctrine he is famous for.  Man this is getting so old.  His comment,  "that your nations could be full partners in our economy and your children can have a fair shot at pursuing the American dream and that no one has to live under the cloud of fear or injustice"  is so transparent to anyone with even a below average IQ. 
Obama, you got the fair shot, man. If you can make it, a guy who never went to a Fourth of July picnic or parade when he was a kid, a guy who lived in Indonesia growing up and then was raised by communists, and then changed his name from Barry to Barack Hussein Obama. If that’s ‑ if that’s what you got, man, I’d say we’ve got a country that is very tolerant and will give anyone a fair shot.

If anyone should get a fair shot it's the 50% who don't pay a dime in taxes.  Those who have no skin in the game.  Those who only take and don't give back.   Those who made some unfortunate choices.  Those folks need a fair shot in my book.  A shot to get in the game and put some "skin" back into society and the economy. 

As a member of the White Earth reservation of the MN Chippewa Tribe I am  living the dream.  Growing up I was a product of Pine Ridge, Mandaree, Sisseton and Crow Agency.  I danced in Ft. Yates, Crow Fair, New Town, White Shields and at the Sun Dance in Pine Ridge.

I trapped coyotes, fox, coon, beaver, mink and muskrats to make tuition payments.  I put fresh venison and antelope on many Native elders kitchen tables in Pine Ridge.   I probably made more trips through White Clay, Nebraska than any college graduate in the country when I was in high school.

I never asked for a fair shot.  Never expected a fair shot.

Never wanted a hand out or a hand up.  I just wanted to get a degree and find a job. 

The rest was up to me, not the BIA,  not the federal government.

Thank you Mom and Dad for all you did to instill so much into my thinking.

And to Gramma and Grampa for helping so much along the way. 



  

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