Wednesday, May 22, 2019

TESLA

I assume most TESLA owners have a little bit on the ball.

Maybe I assume wrong, that has been known to happen.

Why would anyone want to put their life in the hands of a TESLA autopilot?   I just can't imagine myself doing that.

Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports’ senior director of auto testing slammed the technology: 
“The system’s role should be to help the driver, but the way this technology is deployed, it’s the other way around. It’s incredibly nearsighted. It doesn’t appear to react to brake lights or turn signals, it can’t anticipate what other drivers will do, and as a result, you constantly have to be one step ahead of it."
CR said that multiple testers reported that the Tesla "often changed lanes in ways that a safe human driver would not—cutting too closely in front of other cars, and passing on the right." The article also expressed concern about Tesla's claims that three rearward-facing cameras could detect fast approaching objects.
Fisher continued: "The system has trouble responding to vehicles that approach quickly from behind. Because of this, the system will often cut off a vehicle that is going a much faster speed since it doesn’t seem to sense the oncoming car until it’s relatively close."
Fisher also said that merging is an issue for the software: “It is reluctant to merge in heavy traffic, but when it does, it often immediately applies the brakes to create space behind the follow car—this can be a rude surprise to the vehicle you cut off.”
"In essence, the system does the easy stuff, but the human needs to intervene when things get more complicated," Fisher continued.

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